National Sections of the L5I:

History

Chapter 5: Fighting shy of religion

Little serious attention has been paid by Marxists to Connolly’s analysis of religion, and in particular to his attitude to the Catholic Church in Irish society. Read more...

Chapter 6: James Connolly and women’s liberation

While no discussion of the struggle for women’s emancipation in Ireland seems complete without quoting Connolly’s work, rarely has any attempt been made to evaluate his contribution and thought on th Read more...

Chapter 7: The Protestant working class

Critical scholarship on Connolly’s attempts to grapple with the nature and roots of Loyalist ideology has failed to pursue the very obvious shortcomings of his analyses. The work of Bew, Patterson, Morgan etc., while correctly locating Connolly’s weaknesses in his failure to understand the unique features of social and economic development in Ulster, do so from a position hostile to the traditions and method of classical Marxism. Nowhere among whose who claim that tradition in Ireland has there been any attempt to draw upon the rich lessons of Bolshevism and the Third International on questions of imperialism. Read more...

Chapter 8: The party and the working class

The whole history of revolutionary communism is bound up with the struggle for an effective relationship between the party of the socialist revolutionaries and the mass of the working class. For Marx and Engels, for Lenin, for Trotsky and for each of the Internationals this issue of party and class has been central to political struggle with rival socialist currents. Read more...

Chaper 9: 1916 - Under an outdated banner

On Easter Monday, 24th April 1916, James Connolly embarked on his last great struggle. As vice-president of the Provisional Government and Commandant General of the Dublin Division of the Army of the Irish Republic, he fused the Irish Citizen Army with the revolutionary wing of the Irish Volunteers, under the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB), to strike a blow against British imperialism and proclaim an Irish Republic. Read more...

The first world war - Labour recruits for carnage h

Part three of a history of the Labour Party Read more...

The halting march of Labour forwards? - Labour's liberal years

Part two of a History of the Labour Party by Jon Lewis and Dave Stocking Read more...

Class war in Minneapolis

Fifty years ago the American city of Minneapolis was a battlefield in the class war between workers and bosses. Three strikes in 1934 shook the city and American society to their foundations. The feature of these strikes by the Teamster Union Local 574 was that they were led by Trotskyists. Read more...

The Programme of Peace - by Leon Trotsky

What Is a Peace Program?

What is a peace program? From the viewpoint of the ruling classes or of the parties subservient to them, it is the totality of the demands, the ultimate realization of which must be ensured by the power of militarism. Hence, for the realization of Miliukov’s 1 “peace program” Constantinople must be conquered by force of arms. Vandervelde’s “peace program” requires the expulsion of the Germans from Belgium as an antecedent condition? Bethmanll-Holweg’s plan were founded on the geographical war map. From this stand point the peace clauses reflect but the advantages achieved by force of arms. In other words, the peace program is the war program. Read more...

A.J. Cook –The ‘King Arthur’ of the 1920s

Arthur Scargill has justly been compared with Arthur J. Cook, the secretary of the Miners Federation of Great Britain (MFGB) from 1924 until 1931. During the miners’ great struggle of 1926 no figure came to represent the anger and determination of the miners more than A.J. Cook. He was adored by the militants in every coalfield as a tireless and selfless fighter for the cause of the miners. He was hated by the right wing trade unions leaders. He was pilloried in the bosses’ press. Read more...

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