National Sections of the L5I:

Russia

The Bolsheviks, the Red Army and the Russian Civil War

In 1917 the working class took power in Russia with remarkably little resistance from the bosses. But shortly afterwards the capitalists regrouped and gathered support from the imperialist powers to wage a bloody war on the young communist regime that became known as the Russian Civil War. Ninety years ago in 1919 was a key turning point when the Red Army turned the tide on the reactionary Whites. Jens-Hugo Nyberg takes the opportunity to recount these events and consider the lessons for defending future workers’ revolutions. Read more...

Russian language bulletin of the League

The League for the Fifth international has entered into collaboration with a Russian language Trotskyist bulletin called Movement Towards Socialism. Read more...

Imperialist rivalries fuel Russia-Ukraine gas war

The tensions over gas supplies between Russia and the Ukraine reveal deeper problems which are getting worse, argues Mike Tate Read more...

How the Bolsheviks won leadership of the masses

The Russian workers, particularly those in Petrograd, had suffered a very real setback after the mass street demonstrations of the July Days (3-4 July according to the Julian calendar). Although the Bolsheviks had opposed any attempt to seize power as premature, given the balance of class forces across Russia, they had demonstrated at the head of the armed masses. Now as the demonstrators dispersed, recovering from its fright, the Provisional Government went onto the offensive. The bourgeois press accused the Bolsheviks of leading a failed putsch, slandered their leaders, like Lenin and Zinoviev, as “German agents” attempting to sabotage the Russian military offensive then underway. Read more...

Scramble for gas and oil stokes up imperialist rivalries

June: Russian president Vladimir Putin denounced the plans for the US missile defence system to site key radar and anti-missile batteries in Poland and the Czech Republic, stating in response Russia would be forced to target these facilities. Read more...

Russian Revolution of 1917

Russia on the eve of 1917 was a country dominated by the Tsar and a feudal aristocracy.
In 1914, the Russian empire, allied with France which was its main source of the huge loans keeping its creaking system afloat, entered the First World War against Germany and Austria-Hungary. France had high hopes that the Tsar’s huge peasant army, “the Russian steamroller”, would crush the German armies in the east, enabling it to break through in the west. Read more...

When women set Russia ablaze

The specific role of women workers in the February revolution occurred because of the very acute way the war had affected them. The mobilisation of soldiers and production for the war effort led to enormous deprivation in the cities and villages of Russia. As early as April 1915 there were riots by women demanding bread, and these continued sporadically right through to 1917. Read more...

Parliament: Bolsheviks in the Duma

How should revolutionary socialists act in parliament? Should we risk legitimising powerless legislative bodies? And how do we stop the workers’ MPs from being corrupted in the bosses’ parliaments? These were some of the problems faced by the Bolsheviks before the First World War. Read more...

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