National Sections of the L5I:

Anti-Racism

Race, class and nation in Black America

In a continuing debate over the black question in the USA, GR McColl argues that the comrades of the Trotskyist Fraction remain wedded ahistorically to Trotsky’s slogans of the 1930s rather than developing a concrete analysis of today’s situation. Read more...

Australian Aborigines fight racist attacks on land rights

A new land law proposes the Aboriginal people must demonstrate an “unbroken physical connection” with the land to be able to claim title to it. As Lloyd Cox shows the recent racist hysteria about native title is in “unbroken physical” with two centuries of attempted genocide of the Aboriginal people and their resistance to it. Read more...

British fascism: Routed on the streets

Sir Oswald Mosley, MP, split from Labour to form the New Party in March 1931, together with a group of left MPs. By October 1932 Mosley had transformed the party into the British Union of Fascists. Paul Morris recounts the events that led to his movement’s defeat. Read more...

Slavery: Capitalism’s savage birth

Bill Jenkins reviews The Making of New World Slavery – from the baroque to the modern 1492 – 1800 by Robin Blackburn, Verso 1997, £25 (hardback) Read more...

The left and the ANC government

South Africa’s Government of National Unity (GNU) has been in office for nearly two years. Mandela has been treated virtually as a living saint by the national and international capitalist class for achieving a “peaceful and responsible transition” from white rule to majority rule. Politicians, from Margaret Thatcher to Fidel Castro, have flocked from overseas to see the newborn multi-racial South Africa and bless it in its cradle.

Marxists must penetrate the dense cloud of incense being burned before the image of Nelson Mandela. Read more...

The US left and black liberation

Part 2: From the Comintern to the Socialist Workers Party (USA)

In the last issue John McKee described how American communists fought for a radical break with the US labour movement’s traditions of racial segregation early this century. In this, the second part of his article, he examines the debates about black self-determination in the Comintern in the 1920s and 30s and their influence on the development of the post-war left’s response to black nationalism. Read more...

From the Civil War to the Comintern - Fighting racism in the USA

The oppression suffered by black workers in the USA from the last quarter of the nineteenth century eliminated much of the gains of the early post Civil War period. The reformist labor leaders of the time helped entrench this racism within the trade unions. In the first of two articles (concluding part in TI 18), John McKee explains the roots of this apartheid within the labour movement and shows how a radical, if incomplete, break with this legacy formed part of the early years of US communism under the influence of Lenin's Third International. Read more...

Racism – what it is and how to fight it

“For three years these people, normal people, put shit through my letterbox, spat on me, kicked my child’s push chair, screamed at our visitors. These were women, you know, other mothers. So nice to each other. Animals to us.” (Shaida, Asian mother) Read more...

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