National Sections of the L5I:

Women

When women set Russia ablaze

The specific role of women workers in the February revolution occurred because of the very acute way the war had affected them. The mobilisation of soldiers and production for the war effort led to enormous deprivation in the cities and villages of Russia. As early as April 1915 there were riots by women demanding bread, and these continued sporadically right through to 1917. Read more...

Athens ESF: For a working class women's movement

Resistance to the negative effects of globalisation, particularly through the conscious anti-capitalist movement, has shown that we can unify against a common enemy. While much of the process of globalisation has been to unify the process of exploitation around the globe, there is no doubt that some sections of society are more acutely affected than others. In particular, the rural and urban poor of the least developed countries, the migrants and refugees from poverty and war, and the masses of newly unemployed in the countries of the former Soviet Union. Across all the areas, and in the rich countries, it is women whose lives have changed the most, who suffer the greatest hardship, and who are absolutely key to resisting global capitalism. Read more...

Women fight back!

Women fighting back against globalisation, war and social oppression - what kind of women's movement do we need? Read more...

Votes for Women: socialists and feminists in the suffrage movement

In 1903 the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) was founded. The WSPU became the militant wing of a mass movement of women fighting for the vote. Within this organisation many of the direct action tactics used today were first developed. Kirstie Paton and Stuart King explain the origins of the movement and the divergence of the two wings of the WSPU: the socialists and the feminists. Read more...

Women at the heart of the rebellion

The revolutionary events in Argentina electrified workers all over the world. It inspired those fighting privatisation, rising unemployment and cuts in state welfare being forced down their throats by the International Monetary Fund and local rulers. Read more...

Clara Zetkin and the struggle for a working class women's movement

The period of the 1880's and 1890's in Germany was a period of rapid industrialisation carried through under the guidance of the repressive German state. It saw the birth and growth of German Social Democracy as the mass workers party. It drew women, and children, into industry on a large scale.

It was in this situation that women within the SPD-particularly Clara Zetkin struggled to lay the basis for a socialist led, working class based women's organisation. In 1891 the first issue of Die Gleicheit, subtitled 'for the interests of working women' appeared. It was an independent paper, with its own editorial board, led and coordinated by Social Democratic women, themselves disciplined party members. Read more...

From reserve army to frontline troops: women in the global workforce

When the early socialist campaigners talked about women’s liberation they saw the right to work, access to an independent wage and integration into the collectivity of the workplace as key steps to freedom from subservience and family drudgery.Today, more women do paid labour than ever before: but what does that mean for women’s liberation? Read more...

Women, work and family

Women carry out unpaid work in the home and growing numbers also labour outside the home for lower wages than men. But is there a contradiction between the state’s policy on the family and the bosses’ plans for the workforce? Helen Watson investigates. Read more...

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