National Sections of the L5I:

Asia-Pacific

On the brink of revolution

“The revolution will start, but there will be a lot of blood. It will be very messy. There is no ideology. Angry mobs will turn on Suharto and the Chinese.”

The Indonesian academic who delivered this warning confidently predicts that the “revolution” will begin in April. Read more...

Tiger bears its claws

On 25 February South Korea’s new President, Kim Dae-jung, was sworn into office. In turn he promised Kim Jong-pil the job of Prime Minister, the same man who 17 years earlier headed the secret service agency that tried to kill him while in exile. This unlikely combination, writes Keith Harvey, is the best bet the Korean ruling class have of dealing with a major social and political crisis they will face during 1998. Read more...

Asian economies: from boom to bust

The collapse of the Thai currency last summer unleashed a chain of banking and company failures throughout South East Asia. Keith Harvey assesses the likely effect on the world economy in 1998 and the impact on the Asian class struggle. Read more...

Two million workers strike in China

A wave of strikes and demonstrations has rocked China since the beginning of the year. In July, in the province of Sichuan, the struggle reached a new peak. According to reports monitored in Hong Kong, over 100,000 workers were involved in the protests, which began in late June in response to the closure of three state-owned textile plants in the city of Mianyang. Read more...

China: Stalinists draw near their capitalist goal

The last five years have seen a major change of gear in the Stalinists‘ drive towards capitalism, argues Peter Main Read more...

Capitalist Development in South Korea and Taiwan

The “Tiger Economies” of Asia are presented as proof of capitalism’s ability to develop the Third World. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, their high growth rates have been called the “second shock for Marxism”. Michael Pröbsting examines the unique circumstances which allowed rapid growth in South Korea and Taiwan, and explains the limits of this model of development. Read more...

Parliament stormed as austerity budget hits workers, students and Aboriginals

On 19 August the Australian Congress of Trade Unions (ACTU) called a demonstration outside Parliament in the federal capital Canberra to protest at the new government’s massive budget cuts and proposed new anti-trade unions laws. What the bureaucrats planned was a routine speechfest but the demonstrators had other ideas. Comrades from Workers Power (Australia) were there. Peter Main explores the background to the current attacks and the prospects for a strong working class response. Read more...

Australian Labor: Thirteen years of social con-trick

For a decade and a half, neo-liberal economic programmes have dominated the global scene within the leading club of capitalist nations. Market deregulation, minimal state intervention and cuts in social expenditure have been the norm.

Much the same has happened in Australia. But as in France until 1993, this has occurred for over a decade under a “socialist” government. Since 1983, the governing party has been the Labor Party (ALP) which has a mass base in the working class. Federal elections in the first half of 1996 will decide whether Labor renews its mandate. These elections impose upon revolutionaries the duty to develop a clear analysis of Labor’s years in power together with an electoral tactic that assists the job of breaking workers from their reformist illusions in Labor. Read more...

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