National Sections of the L5I:

China

Getting the measure of China

As the US economy moves into recession, Peter Main looks at the possible repercussions on China, a country that has become an icon of globalisation's dynamism in recent years. Rather than coming to the rescue of world capitalism, he argues that the coming year will see China face slackening export markets at a time when its domestic cycle is moving towards its peak. Read more...

Maoism and the Chinese Revolution

Exert from the Degenerated Revolution

The history of the CCP as the leadership of a peasant based and largely guerrilla army began with the historic defeats of the Chinese proletariat in the years 1926-30. The CCP had entered the Nationalist Party, the Kuomintang (KMT) in a subordinate role in 1923-24 having been under pressure to do so from representatives of the Communist International (CI) since 1922. On 20 March 1926 Chiang Kai-shek led a coup d'Ètat in Canton, at that time the centre of CCP influence. Through the coup Chiang, with communist compliance, disarmed the workers' militia controlled by the CCP-led Hong Kong-Canton General Strike Committee. Read more...

Tibetan riots shake Chinese occupation

Tibetans and their supporters have faced down Chinese police inside the country and disrupted torch-bearing ceremonies for the Beijing Olympics around the world to highlight their cause. Peter Main argues for the right of national self-determination of the Tibetan people Read more...

17th National Congress of the Communist Party of China

Beijing has confirmed an important change of policy at the 17th National Congress of the Communist Party of China, which met in mid-October. The change was signalled by acceptance of President Hu Jintao’s policy that economic development must be guided by a “scientific outlook” in order to build a “harmonious society”. For “scientific outlook” read, “greater party control”. This represents a shift away from the policy of Hu’s predecessor, Jiang Zemin, which encouraged capitalists to expand production as fast as possible, by virtually any means. Read more...

Olympic exploitation, Olympian oppression

The Olympics mean big profits for big business, particularly the global sportswear brands and, with less than a year to go, China’s capitalists have been trying to squeeze the maximum profits from this bourgeois carnival of elitism and chauvinism. Read more...

China: From Mao to the market

Peter Main surveys the changes going on in China which are propelling it forward both economically and politically - but where is it going? Read more...

China’s move to the market

Mark Booth reviews Living with Reform: China since 1989, Timothy Cheek. Read more...

China: speculation, corruption and excessive intervention

In the aftermath of February’s dramatic collapse of the Shanghai stock market, the authorities in Beijing have issued a brochure warning investors of the possible dangers involved in investment, especially in unit trusts. These managed funds have proved to be particularly popular with less experienced investors attracted by the reported combined income of 124.8 billion yuan (some £9 billion) that the funds made in the last year. According to the Asia Times, over 300,000 new accounts were opened on just one day, March 6, and this sector now accounts for very nearly 20% of total stock market values. Read more...

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