National Sections of the L5I:

USA

The oppression of black people in the USA today

The systematic oppression of black Americans is deeply embedded in the fabric of US society. In a nation made up of immigrants, blacks were the ones brought there forcibly and kept as slaves for 150 years. Although racism afflicts many ethnic groups, racism against black people is "justified" by a racist ideology derived from slavery and the hundred year old apartheid system of Jim Crow, which insists on their inferiority to whites. Though officially hidden today, it underpins the horrific inequality in education, employment, housing, healthcare, and levels of poverty dividing black and white Americans.A 2008 report by the National Urban League (Annual Report on Socio-economic Conditions in Black America), which investigates the realities faced by black citizens, has uncovered some brutal facts. It finds that there is still indisputable evidence that the criminal justice system is pitted against young black men, and systematically criminalises them. Read more...

Will Obama bring change to America?

The battle for the White House is on. The parties have officially endorsed their candidates, running mates have been picked and policy proposals are coming into focus. Read more...

Barack Obama: Zionism's "true friend"

With the nomination of America's first black candidate who is in with a real chance of winning the presidency, many anti-racist, progressive activists are looking to him as a source of inspiration and a potential leader to correct the injustices oppression in the USA and around the world. They hope that Obama will bring change to the White House and a new administration that can seek to correct some of the worst excesses of the Bush years. They will be sorely disappointed. Read more...

US Mayday "No Peace, No Work" protest shuts down West Coast ports

On May Day, 29 ports on the West Coast were shut down as 25,000 longshore workers walked off the job in the first political strike against the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Read more...

Barack Obama's dilemma of race and class

After his victory in the Oregon primary on 20 May, with only three more to go in early June, Obama has claimed the nomination is "within reach." Though Hilary Clinton still refuses to admit defeat, the Democratic establishment has turned towards Obama. In mid-May he passed Clinton's tally by winning a steady stream of endorsements from superdelegates - the 796 national party leaders, representatives, senators, and governors who will have the deciding vote in the nomination.With defeat looming, Clinton has resorted to playing the race card, arguing that, almost regardless of the primary results, she should win the nomination because a black candidate could not win the presidential election itself. Contests in West Virginia (13 May) and Kentucky (20 May) saw high votes for Clinton (67% and 65%) due in large part to racism among poorer white voters: Her vote among non-college educated whites in Kentucky rose to 69 percent, among whites with a family income below $50,000, she won 75 percent of the vote. In a CBS exit poll, eight out of 10 Clinton voters said they would be unhappy with Obama as the Democrats' candidate, with only 33% willing to vote for him while 41% said they would vote for McCain. Read more...

US Democrats: Neither Obama nor Clinton

The Democrats and the Republican parties are choosing their presidential candidates. The battle for the White House is on, as the race heats up to decide the Democrat and Republican candidates for this November's elections for the US Presidency. For the Democrats, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton are running each other close for the party's nomination, each with more than $100 million in their campaign war chest; 2008 promises to be the most expensive campaign in history. Read more...

The meaning of the Obama phenomenon

Barack Obama’s revival of old-style populist Democratic rhetoric may win him some working class voters. But his policies cannot change their lives for the better, and need to be exposed Read more...

Bush's dream of a "new American century" finally extinguished in Heiligendamm?

The G8 summit produced the now routine empty promises but also showed ominous signs of growing tensions and conflicts between the great powers. Dave Stockton argues that the two terms of the Bush presidency, far from laying the basis for “another American century", have proved to be a disaster for US imperialism as its hegemony in the world faces unprecedented challenges. Read more...

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