National Sections of the L5I:

France

The anticapitalist party project of the Ligue Communiste Révolutionnaire

Martin Suchanek interviews Marc Lassalle and Ines Fertin from France on the new project of the LCR. Read more...

France: Lutte Ouvrière deaf to call for anticapitalist party

The annual fair, hosted by French far left group, Lutte Ouvrière (LO), took place in blazing sunshine this year. But unfortunately for the organisers, the main topic of discussion amongst the visitors was the proposal of their long-term rival, the Ligue Communiste Révolutionniare (LCR), for a new anticapitalist party. The various factions and organisations were, reports Jeremy Dewar, judging each other and being judged on the basis of their response to one question: "What do you propose to do about the LCR's call for a new party?" Read more...

France, May '68  'Everything was possible'

At the start of 1968 France had 550,000 students, well over a third of them located in Paris. Their numbers had nearly tripled since 1960. This spectacular growth was a reflection of the changing needs of French capitalism, which had undergone a feverish technological renewal in the 10 years following de Gaulle's seizure of power in 1958. Read more...

The LCR and the new anticapitalist party

Against the background of Nicolas Sarkozy completing his first year in office and with more attacks upcoming, the Ligue Communiste RÈvolutionnaire (LCR) has launched a campaign for a new anticapitalist party. Martin Suchanek looks at how revolutionaries should respond to this. Read more...

France: can a new, revolutionary party be forged in struggle?

The last year has been a crucial one in France. First, Nicolas Sarkozy was elected president on a platform that promised a wave of massive attacks against the working class. Then came the first major battle, as railway workers defied him. Although they were defeated on the field of battle, this was a result of the betrayals of their own leaderships, not any reluctance to fight. Indeed, the union leaders had clearly signalled their intention to surrender on the very eve of the battle. Lastly, once again, the "revolutionary left" proved to be the dog that did not bark, that is, it failed to alert workers to bureaucratic treachery. This left  the heirs of May 1968  is itself clearly at a turning point. Lutte Ouvriere (LO), the most unchanging of them all, is moving rightwards to standing on a common slate with the Parti socialiste (PS) and has finally expelled its only faction. Meanwhile, the Ligue communiste rÈvolutionaire (LCR) has decided to launch a new, anticapitalist party. Read more...

France: indefinite general strike can defeat Sarkozy’s attack

The French working class and youth have launched a formidable fightback against President Nicolas Sarkozy and his new right wing government. Teachers, posties and civil servants have linked up on strike alongside the railworkers. Three thousand high school students – lycéens – took their first day of action the two days later, while students at 43 of the country’s 80 universities are on strike, shutting down 28 of them completely. Read more...

France: transport strikes and student occupations start fightback!

France once again ground to a halt yesterday, less than a month after a highly successful rail strike paralysed the country. This time the strike was just as effective. Train drivers at the state-owned SNCF rail company stopped work on the night of Tuesday 13 November, and the shutdown was extended yesterday to the Paris Metro. 300 kilometres (190 miles) of traffic jams were reported on roads heading into Paris, twice the usual size. Read more...

As Sarkozy tries to ban right to strike, can workers break him?

Despite the opposition of thousands of French workers, who took to the streets in protest, right wing President Nicolas Sarkozy drove through parliament a law aimed at crippling the right to strike in public transport. The law requires workers to declare themselves as strikers 48 hours before taking action, and obliges unions to maintain a minimum level of service. They even have to facilitate the deployment of scabs to break their own strikes! Read more...

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