National Sections of the L5I:

Asia-Pacific

Vietnam two decades on, once more the dollar is god

The Vietnamese Communist Party swept victoriously into Saigon nearly twenty years ago. Brought to power in a mass, revolutionary war would the Stalinist regime escape the fate of its Russian and East European backers? Twenty years on the answer is clearly no. Chris Bryant examines the Vietnamese bureaucracy’s journey from anti-imperialist victory to an attempt at capitalist restoration. Read more...

Elections solve nothing

Under the auspices of the United Nations one of the world’s key “trouble spots”, Cambodia, has just witnessed elections designed to end the civil war. Chris Bryant looks at the background to these elections and explains why none of the alternatives on offer can bring a progressive solution to the conflict any nearer. Read more...

China: “socialism” with capitalist characteristics

On present trends China could be the biggest economy in the world by the year 2010. But will it be capitalist? Peter Main explores the contradictory dynamic of the present phase of economic development. Read more...

New Zealand bosses on the rampage

For the last year the industrial scene has been dominated by struggles under the Employment Contracts Act. Here, in two articles, Leo Brown of Workers Power (New Zealand/Aotearoa) looks at why New Zealand bosses insisted on this legislation and its repercussions on the labour movement. Read more...

China: revolution and repression

Passed at the MRCI delegate conference, June 1989

China has just passed through a profound political revolutionary crisis. It was a crisis which objectively posed the possibility of the revolutionary overthrow of the ruling bureaucracy. Faced with mass opposition in the cities the bureaucratic regime was paralysed. Industry ground to a halt. The bureaucracy’s control of its armed forces was shaken. In that crisis decisive action by the working class could have overthrown the regime. The potential for political revolution could have been turned into the reality of proletarian political revolution itself. Read more...

The Burmese way crumbles

The Burmese way crumbles

Burma’s military regime is in crisis. Julian Scholefleld explains the background and argues that neither the ‘Burmese Way” nor the plans of the liberal opposition can break imperialism’s stranglehold on the country Read more...